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JB Bass

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In the year 1888, three years after their honourable discharge following many years loyal service with The Prince Consort’s Own 95th Rifle Brigade, Prince Albert’s Own 11th Hussar regiment and Queen Victoria’s Covert Special Forces unit, Major James Bartholomew Bass and Commander Alan Tiberius Blackmore are recruited into the London Metropolitan Police Force by their ex-Army commanding officer and friend, Detective Chief Superintendent Francis (Frank) William Abilene.

  Elevated immediately to the rank of Detective Inspectors, over the course of the next decade Bass and Blackmore set to work establishing a formidable reputation amongst both their colleagues, and the criminal fraternity of London, for the implementation of their unorthodox, and often morally questionable, policing methods that proved to be, nevertheless, prime factors in aiding them to successfully conclude a significantly large number of high-profile cases, including that of the infamous ‘Whitechapel Ripper’ murders of 1888, a story recounted in greater detail within the pages of my debut work, ’89, Manning Place.’

  The sophomore novel in ‘The Victorian Detectives’ series, entitled ‘An Appointment with Destiny’, begins in the heart of London, in the year 1898.

In the wake of a particularly ferocious altercation  with a group of mysterious ‘Black Guard’ operatives on Tower Bridge, Bass and Blackmore are made acutely aware by their great friend and colleague, Captain Pontius Maximillian Aston, of the absolute necessity for the successful conclusion of their next mission: to protect the life, at all costs, of the one man who is destined to save humankind from the potentially catastrophic overrule of their arch nemesis, ‘The Architect’; Winston Leonard Randolph Churchill.

Seemingly untroubled by his brush with death, and steadfastly vowing to continue on with taking up his new employment by two prominent city broadsheets as a war correspondent, responsible for reporting on a daily basis directly from the front line on the progress of the British Expeditionary Force  during the second Boer War in South Africa, Churchill is accompanied on his journey by Bass and Blackmore, whose raft of uncompromisingly effective fighting skills are tested to the full as the life of their ward is immediately challenged by forces loyal to ‘The Architect.’

Initially cleverly thwarted in their intended task and taken as prisoners of war by Boer Militia, along with Churchill, and incarcerated in the British Officers Prison in Pretoria, Bass and Blackmore are rendered powerless to intervene as they become aware that ‘The Architect’ has, in some fashion known only to himself, banished them far into an inconceivable alternate future, where the worst nightmare of both themselves, and their peers, has become a reality: that of a totalitarian fascist World order presided over by their sworn enemy, ‘The Architect.’

  Realising that their failure to protect Churchill has resulted in the catastrophic chain of events that have guaranteed this misaligned version of history, Bass and Blackmore must discover a way to cross dimensions and risk altering the fragile equilibrium of time itself in order to first cancel out the random element of chance responsible for plunging the World into a maelstrom of chaos, and then somehow restore all that erroneously became, to all as it should have been.